Development

 Children grow and learn at their own pace. 

The list below shows what most children are able to do at this stage.

If you notice that a child is not doing many of these, you can talk to the parents or contact The Center for Inclusive Child Care.

  • Asks questions to seek information
  • Can dress self completely
  • Wants to learn the difference between what is real and what is make believe
  • Starts to decide what is fair and unfair
  • Understands his cultural identity
  • Enjoys exploring cultures of friends or other children
     

3 to 4 years<<5 to 6 years

 Children grow and learn at their own pace. 

The list below shows what most children are able to do at this stage.

If you notice that a child is not doing many of these, you can talk to the parents or contact The Center for Inclusive Child Care.

 

  • balances on one foot
  • Sings songs
  • Comforts friends
  • Uses four- to five-word sentences
  • Enjoys active play
  • Can name three colors and count to 10
  • Seeks labels for race, gender and abilities

 Children grow and learn at their own pace. 

The list below shows what most children are able to do at this stage.

If you notice that a child is not doing many of these, you can talk to the parents or contact The Center for Inclusive Child Care.

  • Plays with others
  • Knows the names of colors and how to draw shapes
  • Uses action words
  • Identifies people according to physical features
  • Starts to decide who is a good person and who is a bad person, and how they feel about themselves
  • Pedals a tricycle
  • Opens door using door knob

2 to 3 years<<3 to 4 years>>5 to 6 years

 Children grow and learn at their own pace. 

The list below shows what most children are able to do at this stage.

If you notice that a child is not doing many of these, you can talk to the parents or contact The Center for Inclusive Child Care.

  • Kicks, jumps, and walks up and down stairs
  • Pretends and shows affection
  • Uses three-word phrases
  • Identifies people with words
  • Understands that boys and girls are different
  • Says at least 100 words

18 to 24 months<<2 to 3 years>>3 to 4 years

 Children grow and learn at their own pace. 

The list below shows what most children are able to do at this stage.

If you notice that a child is not doing many of these, you can talk to the parents or contact The Center for Inclusive Child Care.

  • Can build a tower
  • Likes to climb
  • Uses single words a lot
  • Is able to run
  • Looks at pictures in a book
  • Begins to use two-word phrases

15 to 18 months<<18 to 24 months>>2 to 3 years

 Children grow and learn at their own pace. 

The list below shows what most children are able to do at this stage.

If you notice that a child is not doing many of these, you can talk to the parents or contact The Center for Inclusive Child Care.

  • Dances and sings
  • Puts two words together
  • Uses 10-15 words on his/her own without encouragement
  • Tries to be helpful
  • Is sensitive and may feel emotions that adults around him have

12 to 15 months<<15 to 18 months>>18 to 24 months

 Children grow and learn at their own pace. 

The list below shows what most children are able to do at this stage.

If you notice that a child is not doing many of these, you can talk to the parents or contact The Center for Inclusive Child Care.

  • Begins walking without help
  • Scribbles
  • Begins using words
  • Plays next to other children
  • Can experience and show shame
  • Begins to imitate adult behavior

9 to 12 months<<12 to 15 months>>15 to 18 months

 

Children grow and learn at their own pace. 

The list below shows what most children are able to do at this stage.

If you notice that a child is not doing many of these, you can talk to the parents or contact The Center for Inclusive Child Care.

  • Says simple words
  • Moves very fast – crawling and walking
  • Plays hiding games
  • Uses sounds and gestures
  • Begins to show sense of humor

6 to 9 months<<9 to 12 months>>12 to 15 months

 

 Children grow and learn at their own pace. 

The list below shows what most children are able to do at this stage.

If you notice that a child is not doing many of these, you can talk to the parents or contact The Center for Inclusive Child Care.

  • Sits up without help
  • Aware of self and aware of differences in other people
  • Looks into a mirror
  • Responds to her name
  • Makes several sounds in a row
  • Clings – experiences and shows fear
  • Begins chewing
  • Rolls over – can stand for short time with support

3 to 6 months<<6 to 9 months>>9 to 12 months

 Children grow and learn at their own pace. 

The list below shows what most children are able to do at this stage.

If you notice that a child is not doing many of these, you can talk to the parents or contact The Center for Inclusive Child Care.

  • Rolls over
  • Follows objects with eyes
  • Makes single sounds
  • Shows feelings
  • Grasps objects
  • Recognizes faces he sees often

Birth to 3 months<<3 to 6 months>>6 to 9 months
 

 Children grow and learn at their own pace. 

The list below shows what most children are able to do at this stage.

If you notice that a child is not doing many of these, you can talk to the parents or contact The Center for Inclusive Child Care.

  • Lifts head
  • Looks at faces
  • Smiles and coos when spoken to
  • Cries
  • Likes to be held and rocked
     

>>3 to 6 months

You can help a child grow in many ways.

If you know when babies and children are able to do new things, you will know more about what they need from you.

Children start to learn as soon as they are born. When you cuddle, talk, read, play and dance with children, this helps them grow healthy and happy and safe.

Children grow and learn at their own pace. 

The list below shows the ages when most babies and young children are able to do certain things.

If you notice that a child is not doing many of these, you can talk to the parents or contact The Center for Inclusive Child Care.

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